Egg vending machines

(Article from The Bugle Dordogne)

We’ve all been there… deciding what we fancy for dinner and opening the fridge door only to find that one crucial ingredient is missing. The concept of the 24-hour supermarket has yet to reach these shores and French trading laws mean that not much is open on a Sunday, so there is often very little we can do. Technology is often the answer to these first world problems, and hot on the heels of the 24/7 baguette dispenser comes the automatic egg vending machine. Those with concerns for animal welfare should not worry, the hens are not stuffed in the back and forced to lay on request. Rather, the eggs in the vending machines around Gevrey-Chambertin, near Dijon, come from free-range hens on a local farm.  The machines, which have been installed in five nearby communes, sell two boxes of six eggs for just €2.50, and are coin operate  meaning that locals can drive or walk up to them at any time of the day or night, put in their change, and take away fresh eggs. The machines
are reloaded every two days meaning no more frustration if you fancy a last-minute Yorkshire pudding with your Sunday roast!

The innovative idea is supported by the mayor of the nearby commune of SaintPhilibert, who was frustrated by the loss of local shops. “In our commune of just over 500 people, we lost our last shop seven years ago. We had been hoping to find someone to take it over, but that has not been the case.” The mayor hopes that schemes such as these will bring back some life to small rural villages.

Source/Credit:  The Bugle Dordogne / Photo: Facebook

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Dordogne Travels: The Lure of Périgord

Village of Castelnaud-la-Chapelle in the Dordogne
Village of Castelnaud-la-Chapelle in the Dordogne. Photo: Jonathan Barbot

La Dordogne: an ancient realm where dark rivers sweep under limestone cliffs and medieval hilltop villages emerge from lush dense forest; where a cornucopia of local produce has created a rich and abundant gastronomic heritage; where the extraordinary legacy of prehistoric cave art contrasts with the sublime architecture of grand Renaissance châteaux; where today’s traveller can stay for a week, a month, a season and never grow jaded. Guy Hibbert explores…

The Périgord, to use the old name for the modern French department number 24, the Dordogne, is a multi-faceted jewel of a region in South-West France, where the sun is high enough to make for warm humid summers, sunny dry autumns, short sharp winters and lush verdant springtimes.

Many people claim to know the Dordogne but when you challenge them on their knowledge, it turns out they know their favourite patch well, but have only been to one or two towns and villages beyond – in other words, they have formed their opinion too early. To discover all that this grand region has to offer requires time and imagination, to venture away from the tourist hot-spots, to meander a little off the beaten track, to allow time to linger and create your own memorable experiences.

Rooftops of Périgueux
Rooftops of Périgueux. Photo: OT de Périgueux

‘Dordogneshire’

The British have a long association with the Dordogne, and fought over it often during the Hundred Years’ War in the 14th and 15th centuries. By contrast, today’s Brits are more likely to be seen fighting over an old property for sale, enjoying the sensual delights of a summer market or canoeing down a river. So popular has the region proved with expats that national newspaper journalists in the UK enjoy referring to ‘Dordogneshire’ and if your only experience is passing through Bergerac airport or visiting the pretty town of Eymet then you might think that this reputation has been well earned.

It’s no surprise the British love the area – it reminds them of the more picturesque parts of England, say the Cotswolds, but with less crowds and better weather. But it would be a great mistake to label the Dordogne in this clichéd manner. Nostalgia for pastoral idylls is a powerful draw for many travellers, not just the British, and this is a corner of France that can deliver a heady antidote to the stress of busy lives, giving a taste of what has often been lost in more densely populated parts of the world. Like an actor who happens to be excellent at a certain role, there is always a danger of typecasting – but the reality is that la Dordogne is a star with a diverse portfolio ready to be revealed, if you know how and where to look.

Issigeac
Issigeac. Photo: Guy Hibbert

Take a moment to consider the Dordogne ‘by numbers’ and you will begin to appreciate its scale and diversity. It’s actually the third largest département in France and can easily take two and a half hours to cross by road from one border to another. And no wonder its river-based activities are legendary because it has over 500 kilometres of navigable waterways, including the mighty Dordogne, the Vézère, Isle and Dronne. All this space is beautifully green: of the 557 communes, 497 are rural. The tourism office is rightly proud of the fact that they have 190 different sites and monuments open to visitors, including 70 or so museums, no fewer than 10 of France’s listed villages, 15 UNESCO World Heritage prehistoric sites, over 250 hotels, a similar number of campsites and literally thousands of gîtes and country properties for rental. No wonder three million tourists come to the Dordogne every year.

And yet there is space for them all. Because, aside from its supremacy in numbers, the Dordogne is big enough to offer a charming diversity of landscapes, attractions and activities to cater for most tastes and to allow people to join in the action or be an escapist, as the mood dictates.

Issigeac
Issigeac. Photo: Guy Hibbert

The Four Colours of Périgord

Some years ago the tourist authorities hit upon a distinct way of naming some of the territories within thedépartement – the so called four Périgords, the Noir,Pourpre, Blanc and Vert (black, purple, white and green). Unlike some more fanciful labels these labels are actually quite handy to get your bearings and they allow the visitor to get a sense of what lies beyond the hotspot destinations. Having lived and travelled in the Dordogne I can vouch for the aptness of the names.

Périgord Noir lies in the southeast and contains that most quintessential of Dordogne towns, Sarlat, where golden and ochre medieval buildings cast deep cooling shadows over immensely picturesque cobbled streets lined with souvenir shops and restaurants serving an endless array of local gastronomic specialities – avoiding duck on the menu is simply not an option. Visit Sarlat in the evening to appreciate the romantic lighting and special ambience. Périgord Noir is also home to the Vézère valley with its magnificent networks of underground caves and grottoes, and the Dordogne valley with its magnificent châteaux on their pinnacles overlooking the broad, shining river below. This is the heart of the Dordogne that many tourists know and love and return to summer after summer.

Montpazier medieval festival
Montpazier medieval festival. Photo: Jonathan Barbot

Bastide Towns

To the west lies Périgord Pourpre, so named from the colour of the grape, as this is home to the lovely city of Bergerac (of Cyrano fame), surrounded by vineyards producing the much-appreciated Bergerac Blancs and Rouges, with the sweet wines of Monbazillac grown to the south of the city and less well-known reds such as AOC Pécharmant to the east. Périgord Pourpre also encompasses the numerous fascinating 13th-century bastide towns such as Monpazier and Beaumont-du-Périgord with their unique grid layout and fortifications which tell terrible tales of the battles of the Hundred Years’ War.

The central Dordogne, to the north of Bergerac, is named the Périgord Blanc, because of thecalcaire, the bright limestone that underlies the gentle rolling hills and valleys of open farmland and supplies the characteristic white stone for many buildings, including many striking Romanesque churches. The capital of the Dordogne, Périgueux, with its spectacular Romanesque cathedral and quaint vieille ville (great for shopping), is situated in this department, as is the country town of Ribérac, where a very popular market takes place every Friday.

To the northeast of the department lies the Périgord Vert, bordering on the Limousin, where green chestnut and oak forests are interspersed with cattle-grazing pastures. Visitors here head for the picturesque town of Brantôme, with its medieval abbey in white limestone, and the lovely village of Bourdeilles, with its château to visit and where a picnic by the gentle Dronne river is one of my favourite days out.

The ancient cave paintings of Lascaux
The ancient cave paintings of Lascaux. Photo: Sémitour

Prehistoric Marvels

Now you’ve got your bearings, the question is, in which direction to head first? Of course this all depends on your priorities. But for starters almost everyone can find inspiration in the ‘Vallée de la Préhistoire’, an unrivalled location for caves, caverns and underground treasures. With 147 sites, 15 of which are UNESCO World Heritage listed, there’s scope for everyone, but atop the many archaeological wonders sits the ‘Sistine Chapel of Prehistory’, the wonderful Lascaux cave network with its extraordinary cave paintings, first discovered by four teenagers back in 1940. The year 2016 brings exciting developments for Lascaux, with the opening of The Centre International d’Art Pariétal Montignac-Lascaux (or Lascaux 4), a grand scheme blending contemporary architecture and design which will offer a full reproduction of the Lascaux cave thanks to new virtual reality and image technology.

Beyond Lascaux there are plenty of other underground attractions including the original cave paintings at Font-de-Gaumes, Les Eyzies, the unusually beautiful geological formations at the Gouffre de Proumeyssac and Maxange caves or the chance to go pot-holing at the Grotte de Beaussac.

Montfort
Montfort. © Mathieu Anglada
Montignac
Montignac. Photo: Jonathan Barbot

Châteaux and Villages

Above ground, more traditional but equally uplifting architecture awaits, because the Dordogne has more than its fair share of châteaux to visit. From early fortified castles such as the cave fortress at Reignac and the imperious heights of Beynac and Castelnaud to the Renaissance masterpieces of Jumilhac and Milandes, which was built by the Lord of Caumont for his wife in 1489 but became much more famous in the last century as the home of chanteuse Josephine Baker and her children.

On a much more modest scale, but no less appealing, are the typical golden-stoned blue-shuttered villages of the Dordogne. The greatest claims to fame lies in the fact that no less than ten of the plus beaux villages de France are scattered throughout the department. In fact, the Dordogne is home to the largest number of listed villages in France. Situated 20km from Sarlat, Saint-Amand-de-Coly nestles between two wooded valleys and is famous for its 12th-century abbey. In the Périgord Vert, Saint-Jean-de-Côle’s history is linked with that of the Château de la Marthonie, which dominates its main square, while the typical village of Saint-Léon-sur-Vézère between Montignac and Les Eyzies boasts no fewer than three castles. Other villages include Limeuil (overlooking the confluence of the Dordogne and Vézère), Monpazier, La Roque-Gageac, Belvès, Domme, Castelnaud-la-Chapelle and Beynac-et-Cazenac.

Château de Bridoire
le Château de Bridoire. Photo: Guy Hibbert

Summertime Fun – for Children of all Ages

The summer season delivers maximum value for family holidaymakers with over a hundred events and activities focused on the younger tourists. Under the seductive heat of the Périgord sun there are plenty of activities to entertain the kids. After they have exhausted the pleasures of family canoeing why not give them a little education about ancient history at the Prehistory Labyrinth, opening in 2016, where they become explorers for a day. Or visit the Isle river near Jumilhac for a spot of gold-panning. For a theme park with a gentle French country vibe try Le Bournat. And don’t forget that many châteaux stage activities and displays with falconry, jousting and medieval street fairs to enjoy.

Anyone looking for more active pastimes is well catered for – the département offers numerous canoeing, kayaking, cycling and hiking trails for all standards, some, such as the Cro-Magnon Footpath, follow in the footsteps of prehistoric man. Organise your own ad hoc expedition or join in one of the many organised events. There truly is something for everybody – vintage costume and bicycle fans, for example, should not miss the retro cycle rally leaving from Monbazillac in August.

A shop in the Dordogne
A shop in the Dordogne. Photo: Guy Hibbert

More Unexpected Pleasures to be Discovered

But often the charm of the Dordogne lies in the unexpected. You are driving or cycling and en route you take a wrong turn and find yourself in a little village which wasn’t recommended and hasn’t won any accolades. But as you look around your mystery village there’s an irresistible ambience – you have stumbled into a haven where time appears to have stood still for centuries. So you stop for a leisurelydéjeuner in a sleepy café and admire the sun filtering through the canopy of an ancient plane tree in the square. You exchange some friendly words with the waiter and watch a couple of old gents sitting and chatting on a bench near the fountain. On a crumbling ochre wall you notice the faded blue and white painted lettering advertising a long forgotten liqueur while at the foot of the wall a cat stretches lazily in the spring sunshine. In other words, you slow down, and you let the Dordogne, this rich and magically diverse region, fold its warming arms around you.

From France Today magazine

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Dordogne strawberries
Dordogne strawberries. Photo: B. Plantevin/ Chambre Agriculture Dordogne

A Foodie Heaven

Blessed with fertile soils, enough rain to irrigate and plenty of warm sun to ripen its produce, the Dordogne offers an extravagant palate of local produce to tempt you.

Dordogne strawberries are hard to beat (buy them from any market and be sure to eat them the same day!) Sweet and fragrant, with many varieties to choose from – they even have their own website.

Walnuts are a Dordogne speciality, with Appellation d’Origine Contrôlée status. You’ll enjoy them on a classic Périgordine salad – or even better, take back some walnut oil to dress your salads at home.

Perigord Truffles
Perigord Truffles. Photo: CP Ecomusée de la truffe

Black truffles are a local speciality highly prized by chefs for their delicate, aromatic, yet ear thy flavour. The truffles are harvested from December to February and sold in markets at very high prices.

Foie gras can divide opinion but there’s no getting away from its status in the Dordogne, where the duck and goose varieties are served in nearly all restaurants as an appetiser or cooked as part of a gastronomic main course.

Duck features in many shapes and forms within Périgordine cuisine, served as rillettes (a kind of pâté) on toast as a starter or cooked as magrets (grilled breast with a sauce) or confits (preserved in fat, served crispy).

Perigord walnuts
Perigord walnuts. Photo: Syndicat Professionnel Noix du Perigord

SOURCE/CREDIT:  France Today By Guy Hibbert – September 21, 2016

Beware Matey – Pirates near Brive – Argh!

The restaurant, Le Rocher des Pirates, is a magical place that will transport you to the center of the Caribbean Sea.  Come loot our gastronic treasures, made in-house with fresh ingredients. Feel like the Pirate of the Carribean among family and/or friends for a truly unique dining experience. *

“Le Rocher des Pirates, un univers magique, feerique, qui vous transportera au centre des mers des Caraibes. Venez pillers leur tresors gastronomiques, produits frais realisees sur place. Devenez le Capitaine corsaire autour d’un repas en famille ou entre amis dans un endroit unique.” (Source: restaurant business card)

  • During lunch, there were theatrical scenes of pirate fighting to add to the authentic ambiance and themed fun for customers.

 

Rocher des Pirates, Rue de Sokal, ZAC du Moulin in Malemort (in the Leroy Merlin commercial center in Malemort next to Brive) – open 7 days a week from 8h30 to 23h00 & Sunday from 10h00 to 22h00

Where to Stay and Eat in the Dordogne

The best restaurants and hotels in the region, some of which are even in the same house.

 Chartreuse du Bignac
Foie gras and wine. Photo: Chartreuse du Bignac

TOP RESTAURANT SELECTION

Charbonnel, Brantôme

Getting rave reviews and giving the nearby Moulin de l’Abbaye a run for its money.

L’Imaginaire, Terrasson

The French are flocking to eat the new menus prepared by rising star chef Julien Dayre.

La Tour des Vents, Monbazillac

Sumptuous cuisine, impeccable service, a panoramic view over the city of Bergerac… What’s not to like? [Read our full review here.]

 La Tour des Vents
courtesy of La Tour des Vents

Les Jardins d’Harmonie, Sarlat

Fresh Périgordine produce prepared and cooked with flair and imagination. The hot ticket in a city with a huge choice of tables.

Le Vieux Logis, Trémolat

Summer dining on the terrace is a must at this Relais et Châteaux establishment which gets five-star Trip Advisor reviews.

Les Glycines, Les Eyzies-de-Tayac

Refined, contemporary dining with an emphasis on local ingredients gives this former relais de poste its reputation.

L’Essentiel, Périgueux

People come here for a special lunch or dinner. Eric Vidal has held his Michelin star since 2008.

L’Imparfait, Bergerac

Sit outside on a warm day and soak up the ambience as you eat classic French dishes with a twist at this Bergerac stalwart.

Chartreause du Bignac
Chartreause du Bignac, in the Périgord-Pourpre

TOP HOTEL SELECTION

Les Glycines, Les Eyzies-de-Tayac

Old coaching inn with a contemporary design twist, restaurant (see above), spa, pool and bistro – the best place to stay near Les Eyzies.

La Chartreuse de Bignac, Monbazillac

A beautifully restored property perched on a stunning hillside location, with pool and restaurant – here it’s all about relaxation.

Le Mas de Montet, Petit-Bersac

French Renaissance château with wonderful bedrooms and lounges, a huge pool and a pleasant restaurant.

Château de Lalande

Charming and elegant rooms await you in this impressive 18th-century château not far from Périgueux. Terraces, gardens, pool and gourmet dining, it has it all.

La Roseraie hotel
La Roseraie hotel

La Roseraie, Montignac

Visit in May to experience the best of the wonderful rose gardens, or any time of year for country charm on the banks of the Vézère.

Le Moulin du Roc, Champagnac-de-Belair

Stylishly converted mill not far from Brantôme. Dining in the romantic restaurant or on the riverside terrace adds to the appeal.

Le Vieux Logis, Trémolat

Elegance and bucolic charm throughout the house and gardens, and a top-notch restaurant (see above).

 

Above article by Guy Hibbert – September 25, 2016 for FRANCE TODAY

 

 

TOP-RATED ACCOMMODATION IN SARLAT: 

Manoir Fontaine de l’Amour offers you a two bedroom, two bathroom, fully-equipped accommodation within walking distance to the historic center. Come enjoy our “havre de paix” (peaceful oasis) !

Manoir Fontaine de l’Amour

Watch slideshow video HERE

Our first year has been interesting and we have met lovely people; the most dramatic was when there was a kitten stuck up under the wheel well of our client’s Porsche and we had to phone the Fire Dept. to come access from underneath via pneumatic pillows to lift the car to rescue the kitten!

Macarons | The history and endurability of Macarons

Written by Janine Marsh in French Cuisine for The Good Life France

macarons

Macarons or macaroons are those timeless little desert biscuits… fads may come and fads may go says Janine Marsh who knows a good macaron when she eats one – but macarons, those little aristocrats of the patisserie world, will always be in fashion.

Popular myth has it that macarons, the pretty little crunchy, soft biscuit cakes, came to France in 1533 when Catherine de Medici arrived from Italy to marry Henry II of France.

macaronsMacarons are certainly of Italian origin, possibly dating back as far as the 8th Century after almonds started to be imported to Venice.

They seem though to have become archetypically French over the centuries ensuing.

One of the legendary stories of macarons dates back to the 18th century in the city of Nancy in eastern France. At the Convent of the Dames du Saint Sacrement, the nuns baked macarons because meat was forbidden and the sweet little cakes were nutritious – and of course delicious.

In 1792, two of the nuns, Sisters Marguerite and Marie-Elisabeth, began selling macarons commercially to the general public after losing their home in the days of French Revolutionary chaos and anti-religious fervour.

Their little crispy rustic looking macaron biscuits became instantly popular and the secret recipe has been passed on from one generation to another. Today Maison des Soeurs Macaron in Nancy continues to produce the macarons to the same centuries old recipe, a single biscuit with a rough, cracked top and a scrumptiously soft and chewy inside.

Elsewhere in France there are other legends, more stories of the making and popularity of macarons including that of one of the most famous macaron outlets in Paris – Ladurée.

macarons

In 1862, Louis Ernest Ladurée created a bakery at 16 rue Royale in the heart of Paris. When it burned down, Ladurée rebuilt it and employed Jules Cheret, notable painter of the century, to redecorate the new bakery. Inspired by the techniques used to paint the ceilings of the Opera Garnier, he adorned the ceilings and walls. Over the years the bakery became well known for its beautiful interior and superior pastries, becoming one of the largest tea rooms in Paris. In the early 20th Century the grand-son of Louis Ernest Ladurée, came up with an idea to assemble the little macaron biscuits sandwiched by cream and it became a best-selling idea which made the macarons of Laduree their flagship product and famous all over the world.

macarons

Today in Paris there is one man who epitomises the making of a perfect macaron – Pierre Hermé  of Paris is generally acknowledged to be the master . Described as a couturier of pastry, “the Picasso of Pastry” (Vogue) – his macarons are in a league of its own. For the last 15 years he has dominated the macaron market for enthusiastic  gourmets.

So beloved are macarons in France that there is even a museum dedicated to them! The Musée de l’Amande et du Macaron in Montmorillon, Vienne, Poituo-Charente where you can learn about the history of this fascinating and enduring little cake and even have a tasting in the museum’s Winter Garden.

Eclairs may come and go, Cronuts (half croissant and half doughnut) may be the darling du jour, but the macaron will keep on going, changing flavours, sweet… savoury, vive la macaron!

More about cakes of France:
Opera Cake – inspired by the Paris Opera
Eclairs – the lip-smacking sweet finger cake!
Stohrer – the oldest cake shop in Paris

Source/Credit:  thegoodlifefrance.com

 

Easy Recipe: Provençal Vegetable Casserole

This easy recipe can be served simply with a crusty baguette.  It can also be enjoyed by vegetarians and vegans!

You will need 1/2 cup plus 3 tablespoons of olive oil, 2 large onions sliced thinly, 3 red bell peppers seeded and thinly sliced, 2 medium eggplants peeled and diagonally sliced, 3 medium zucchinis peeled and thinly sliced diagonally, 3 thinly sliced medium tomatoes, 6 minced garlic cloves, 2 tablespoons chopped basil and Eggplant. Photo courtesy of www.vegan-magazine.com1/2 teaspoon sea salt and freshly ground pepper.

Heat 3 tablespoons of olive oil in a large skillet on moderate heat and cook onions until soft. Add the peppers, and reduce the heat to low, cooking until vegetables are soft ~  about 20 minutes.  Meanwhile, preheat your oven to 400°F.

Layer a 9×13-inch ovenproof baking dish with 3/4 of the onion mixture.  Follow with a layer of the eggplant slices, then layer on half the zucchini and the remaining onion mixture.  The next layer is the remaining eggplant, then the remaining zucchini and finally the tomato slices.  In a small bowl, mix together the rest of the olive oil, garlic, basil, salt and pepper and sprinkle over the top.

Bake for an hour and let it rest for 5 minutes.  Pour off any excess olive oil.  Cut into serving pieces and serve hot.  Serves six.

Bon appétit!

[Photo credit:  http://www.vegan-magazine.com]

SOURCE:  Au Chateau News