French Jazz Fans outsmart Hitler

Article written by Margo Lestz (The Curious Rambler)- Reblogged with permission:

France has a special place in its heart for jazz and in the summer, you’ll find jazz festivals all over the country. In fact, the world’s first international jazz festival was held in Nice, France in 1948. But France’s relationship with this music started some 30 years earlier during the World War I and developed under some interesting circumstances during the Nazi Occupation of World War II.

Jazz comes to France

During World War I, African-American soldiers introduced France to jazz. After the war, this lively new sound was the perfect accompaniment to les années folles, or “the crazy years”, when all art forms were changing and tastes turned to the unconventional and exotic. This new African-American music made people feel alive again, just what was needed after the horrors of the First World War.

Miles Davis statue – Negresco hotel in Nice.  Photo by Margo Lestz

Miles Davis statue – Negresco hotel in Nice. Photo by Margo Lestz

Hot Club

Jazz was especially appreciated by the young and in the early 1930s, a group of Parisian students formed a jazz club. At first they just met to listen to the music, but later they became ambassadors of this new sound. The Hot Club de France quickly grew into an important organisation working to promote jazz in France. Hugues Panassié was president and Charles Delaunay secretary, but in 1936 Louis Armstrong was elected Honorary President of the club and held that title until his death in 1971.

French Jazz

With the help of the Hot Club, jazz took root in post-war France. Although they appreciated the American jazz groups, the Hot Club was on the lookout for French talent. They “discovered” guitarist Django Reinhardt and violinist Stéphane Grappelli who, along with others, became known as the Hot Club Quintet, the first “all French” jazz band.

Jazz during the occupation

When the Second World War was declared, most of the African American jazz musicians left France and the French bands were worried. Hitler wasn’t a jazz fan. He considered it a tool of the Jews and detrimental to society.

But, Hitler was more tolerant in France than in other countries. He wanted to remain on good terms with the French and use their resources for his war effort. He also planned to make Paris a recreation centre for his troops so he encouraged the entertainment industry there. Foreign tunes were absolutely forbidden but he allowed traditional music, thinking his propaganda would be better accepted if it was broadcast along with popular songs.

“Frenchified” jazz

The Hot Club took advantage of this situation and set about creating a “French history” for jazz, proclaiming it a traditional French form of music. They held conferences explaining how jazz was directly inspired by Debussy, an influential French composer of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, and circulated flyers detailing this invented pedigree.

They wrote books to convince Hitler and the Vichy regime of the merits of French jazz. One music critic published a book explaining how it was intrinsically French and how it could become the new European music under the Nazi regime. Hugues Panassié, president of the Hot Club, published a book addressing the Vichy regime’s argument that jazz couldn’t carry a patriotic message. In his book he claimed that jazz had simply been misunderstood and he scattered biblical passages and political quotes throughout to make it sound convincing.

louis_armstrong_aquarium_04Louis Armstrong disguised as a French man (photo: The Curious Rambler)

It’s not swing, it’s jazz

Music experts pointed out that the jazz musicians of the time were all French (the American musicians had left at the start of the war) and they made “adjustments” to make jazz seem more French. At the time the music was called “swing” in France so they started calling it “jazz” which sounded less American.

It’s not blues, it’s tristesse

The titles of songs were changed to French: “St. Louis Blues” became “Tristesse de St. Louis” and “I Got Rhythm” became “Agate Rhythm”. The names of composers were either left off or changed. Louis Armstrong’s songs were credited to Jean Sablon during that time. When they had finished, jazz looked as French as baguettes and brie. Their efforts paid off when the Nazis banned subversive “American swing” but permitted traditional “French jazz”. Of course, it was the same music, just cleverly repackaged.

Jazz and the Resistance

Hot Club members weren’t just defying the Nazis with music, many of them were active members of the Resistance. They used jazz concerts and conferences as cover to pass information to England. In 1943 the Hot Club headquarters in Paris was raided and some of its officials were arrested. Delaunay, Hot Club secretary, was released after one month, but several of the others perished in Nazi concentration camps.

However, jazz survived and kept the French company during the occupation. And when the war was over, France remained faithful to the music that, by that time, really had become woven into French culture.

Click on the video below to see Louis Armstrong learning a song in French with Claudine Panassié, daughter-in-law of Hugues Panassié, president of the Hot Club and director of the 1948 Nice Jazz Festival. It was filmed in 1969 at Armstrong’s home in Corona, New York.

History of the Nice Jazz Festival:

1948 – Nice hosted the first international jazz festival in the world. Louis Armstrong was the headliner and performances were in the opera house and the municipal casino (which once stood in Place Massena).

1972-1973 – The next jazz festival in Nice took place 23 years later. The performances were held in the garden Albert I.

1974 – The Nice jazz festival returned under the name, Grande Parade du Jazz. Musicians played on three stages in the open spaces of the garden of Cimiez. The Nice jazz festival has continued since 1974.

1994 – The name was changed to Nice Jazz Festival.

2011 – The festival moved back into the centre of town and to the garden Albert I where two stages welcome multiple performers each evening.

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Les Pirates in Juan-les-Pins – Aarrgh!

signWith earlier-than-usual hot, sunny weather in the area, I started feeling the need for sand between my toes.  So it was that I decided to have lunch at a beach restaurant, where some of the tables and chairs were actually on the sand, about 30 feet from the sea.  

tab;e

As I wiggled my toes in the sand, I also enjoyed the delicious lunch, sea views, surrounding ambiance, and after lunch stroll along the shore – a delightful place for a Sunday lunch!

(Photo gallery below)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Juan-les-Pins, a commune of Antibes, is well-known for its jazz festival (July 2014 schedule), nightlife, and its casino, just to name a few.

Must-see suggestions (as listed on Tourism Office site):

  • Port Gallice overlooking the bay of Juan-les-Pins
  • the château of Juan-les-Pins (Rudolf Valentino’s former villa)
  • the Belles Rives hotel with its original furniture dating from the 1930s.
  • the villa “La Vigie”
  • the Juana hotel. Designed in 1931, its façade is a listed historic building.
  • the Gould pine grove, where Ray Charles and Miles Davis made their European debuts and where you can see stars’ handprints set in the ground…
  • the many “art deco” buildings.
  • the legendaray fine sandy beaches where waterskiing was born.
  • the Exflora park offering all the freshness of 330 plant essences

 

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July & All That Jaaaazzzz!

Lineup for 2014 Nice Jazz Festival Redefines Eclectic“The annual Nice Jazz Festival has enjoyed great success in recent years, even after the controversial move from its spiritual home in the hills of Cimiez, down to the lowlands of Place Masséna. The 2014 edition looks to be as interesting as ever, with quite an eclectic lineup of artists and acts — where else will you find Deep Purple, Har Mar Superstar and De La Soul on the same bill? This is a jazz showcase, right?”

Running from July 8-12th, there will be great performances by The Gypsy Kings, Ed Motta & the Nice Orchestra Horns, Electro Deluxe and Richard Galliano and the Nice Jazz Orchestra, Dr John & the Nite Trippers featuring Sarah Morrow and Keziah Jones.  The festival will take place on two stages in the center of Nice, one in the Theatre de Verdure and the other on Scene Massena where you can conveniently walk from one performance to another.  (Source/credit: Riviera Buzz)
This year, Nice Mayor Christian Estrossi organized the largest human saxophone in Place Massena on June 21st, setting a new Guinness Book world record, with 1660 locals, and marking the first day of summer and la Fête de la Musique.
jazz photo

Nice jazz schedule, video, and read more HERE

 

See below for Antibes/Juan-les-Pins
antibes jazzPhoto credit: The Riviera Times

 

All that Jazz: Château & Village Tour !

During July and August, there is a free jazz concert every Friday evening at 9pm, held in Haut-de- Cagnes-sur-Mer (about 11 km west of Nice). I attended the first one of the season, and

at 10pm did a lantern-lighted, historical walking tour of the village. There were people in the group from Normandie, Lorraine, Paris, as wll as some locals, with three of the children present designated to carry the lanterns and do a short introductory, verbal presentation at each stopping point; impressive since they had to memorize, on-the-spot, the information that the tour guide had whispered to them.

It was a beautiful, warm, moonlit night; on one of the small medieval streets, we had a distant view of fireworks, taking place at the city’s Hippodrome (horserace track). A booming ending to a great, jazzy evening!