What is a chocolatine?

It is a debate that has raged across France for decades, if not centuries… what do you call the chocolate-filled
pastries so common in the country’s bakeries? Most expats will probably answer pain au chocolat, the term we tend to hear when first learning the language.  Much of the country would disagree, however, and vocally insist that the pastry is in fact a chocolatine.  A website has even been created to try to settle the argument once and for all and the results are in: of the 110,000 people surveyed 59.8% say pain au chocolat and 40.2% say chocolatine, but which you choose will most likely be decided by where you live. Those in the south-west of France almost all use chocolatine, with the remainder of the country opting for pain au chocolat
(see map).
The chocolatine camp feel they should no longer be overlooked and one group of pupils from the southwestern town of Montauban recently penned a letter to France’s president in a bid to get the word chocolatine added to the French dictionary. “It’s a word of our region, where a lot of people live, and there’s no reason why the rest of the country shouldn’t know it. We’re proud to be from the south,” one pupil told La Dépêche du Midi newspaper.  With linguistic battle lines drawn up, Bugle readers find themselves on the front line. In the Dordogne it is most definitely a chocolatine, a fact that pastry lovers in neighbouring Charente and Corrèze would agree with. Travel a short distance to the north, however, and your request may be met with blank stares in other departments of Nouvelle Aquitaine (see
table below). ■

Pain au chocolat (%) Chocolatine (%)

Dordogne              5              95
Corrèze                  6              94
Charente             10              90
Haute-Vienne    57              43
Creuse                 82              18

 

map

Source/Credit: The Bugle

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Our new holiday/vacation rental apartment in Sarlat

WAOH – it certainly has been an interesting and very busy process these past few months, moving into our 200-year old ‘new’ character house, let alone prepping the private/independent fully-equipped apartment for the upcoming rental season.  We proudly announce that you can now book the apartment through our site OR through AirBnB !

The apartment has all the modern comforts while preserving the authentic look of wooden beams and stone walls. Of course, as with any residence, there is always work to do, as we continue to improve the landscaping and garden areas and get the Zodiac pool ready for the summer months.

So, come enjoy our country-like setting (within walking distance to the historic center), and perhaps a glass of wine on the private summer kitchen or outdoor terrace after a long day of sightseeing in Sarlat and the surrounding area.

Nous vous souhaitons le bienvenue

at Manoir Fontaine de l’Amour

A bientot!

 

 

Feed your foodie in holiday heaven – A food lover’s paradise

Ready to indulge yourself with some of the finest food Europe has to offer? It has to be Destination Dordogne!

Think of fine cuisine, mouthwatering dishes and Michelin star creations, and it’s hard to imagine a menu thatdoesn’t include a taste of France. French cuisine is famed the world over. But it’s one particular area of France – Dordogne – which is at the heart of the finest food on the planet. A food lovers’ paradise, it’s the home of the rich, dark, musky Perigord truffle. That alone puts Dordogne at the top of the food chain. From foie gras to morel mushrooms, dozens of local cheeses, the finest wines and traditional rustic duck cheeseand goose dishes washed down with local walnut laced liquour – plus romantic Michelin star restaurants – Dordogne is a food lovers’ heaven. And its stunning scenery means there are plenty of opportunities to work it off, with a cycle ride or romantic stroll alongside chateaux that look like they’ve come straight from a child’s storybook. Feeling tempted?

Here’s our foodie guide to enjoying one of the world’s most mouthwatering destinations.

Head to marketfood stand

Usually in the middle of town, among cobbled lanes and pretty plazas, Dordogne’s markets are a sensory delight. Visit Sarlat-la-Canéda, one of the busiest markets in Dordogne or the pretty medieval village of Issigeac. Head undercover to the market hall at the historic fortified village of Monpazier, voted one of France’s most beautiful village. Buy some Cabecou de Rocamadour – a small local goat’s cheese – a freshly baked loaf and find a spot to sit back and watch.

Dine at the top tables

All that wonderful produce means Dordogne has some of the world’s best and most romantic restaurants. There’s the finest Michelin star dining, to quaint corner bistros and chefs who are pushing the foodie boundaries. Indulge at the beautiful chateau at the Michelin starred Chateau des Vigiers which also boasts a golf course and a spa, or nip into Les Petit Paris in Daglan which specialises in seasonal local produce. The choices are endless.

Top up your glass

Some areas of France might be better known, but there’s no mistaking the quality of wine produced in

wine with rainbow

Dordogne. The Bergerac area has more than 1200 wine-growers, producing excellent reds, whites and rosés to wash down all that gourmet food. Visiting a vineyard is a ‘must’. Head to Château de Tiregand and explore its Pécharmant wines. Or visit Château Montdoyen, where the art of winemaking has been passed through generations.

Tuck into truffles

Dordogne is famed for its black Périgord truffle, or black diamond. You’ll discover truffles on the menus and even special truffle markets in Périgueux, Brantôme and Sarlat-la-Canéda. Or hunt for your own – join a truffle hunting tour and at Truffière de Péchalifour.

Take it outside

A picnic amid stunning scenery is hard to beat. Just stock up at the market and head to La Roque Gageac, one of exteriorthe country’s prettiest villages or in the grounds of the Walnut Museum near Castlenaud. The chateau there is a national monument.

Take a boat trip on the river Dordogne at La Roque-Gageac, picnic by the banks and round it off with a walk to Chateau de la Malartie. Wherever your tastebuds take you, a break in Dordogne is bound to leave you hungry for more. Discover delightful Dordogne for yourself.

Source/Credit: written by Sandra Dick for The Scotsman

12 of the Finest Dordogne Châteaux

This is a land of castles with any number of grand houses to visit. Here is our selection of the best.

Chateau de Beynac
Chateau de Beynac. Photo: OT intercommunal du Périgord noir

The fascinating history of the Dordogne from medieval to modern times is brought to life by the grandeur and mystique of some of its splendid châteaux. When you visit these medieval fortresses, Renaissance palaces and grand family estates you will encounter a rich tapestry, revealing accounts of love and war, ambition and tragedy, fairy-tale romance and escapism. Here is our selection – but many more fine examples await travellers looking for inspiring architecture and remarkable stories from days of yore.

 

Château de Beynac

This imposing fortified castle sitting on a dramatic cliff top location overlooking the River Dordogne has seen almost a thousand years of history played out against its stone walls and courtyards. It is one of the best-preserved in the region.

Château de Bridoire
courtesy of Château de Bridoire

Château de Bridoire

A beautiful 15th-century château near Bergerac, once neglected but now happily in private hands and undergoing a small renaissance. Many restored and furnished rooms to view as well as medieval-style games. Popular with families.

Chateau de Biron
Chateau de Biron. Photo: Pays des bastides

Château de Biron

Near Monpazier, in the south of the Dordogne, this dramatic château from the 12th century is perched on a hillside overlooking the Périgord and Agenais countryside. Visitors will appreciate its many beautiful architectural features.

Chateau de Bourdeilles
Chateau de Bourdeilles. Photo: Semitour Perigord

Château de Bourdeilles

The site of one of the four baronnies of the Périgord, this is an impressive château with a spectacular tower overlooking the River Dronne in the north of the Dordogne near Brantôme. The château and surrounding village are worth a visit.

Chateau de Castelnaud
Chateau de Castelnaud. Photo: M. Boutry

Château de Castelnaud

In the heart of the Périgord Noir this is a medieval fortress with a military history. In keeping with its past life, today it houses a museum of medieval warfare. Enactments of Cathar history take place on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday evenings in summer.

Chateau d'Hautefort
Chateau d’Hautefort. Photo: OT Château d’Hautefort

Château de Hautefort

Closer in appearance to a Loire château, the golden age of this majestic building in the north of the Dordogne was during the time of the Marquis de Hautefort in the 16th and 17th centuries. The beautiful formal gardens are a must-see.

Château de Jumilhac
courtesy of Château de Jumilhac

Château de Jumilhac

The Château de Jumilhac is to be found in the north of the Dordogne, on the route of Richard the Lionheart. With its picturesque turreted Renaissance roofline this imposing château strikes visitors as the quintessential romantic castle.

Château de Lanquais
courtesy of Château de Lanquais

Château de Lanquais

In the Périgord Pourpre, this château dates from the Middle Ages but also boasts some fine work by Italian craftsmen who later helped transform some parts of it into a Renaissance palace. It has been owned by the same family since 1732.

Chateau de Milandes
Chateau de Milandes. Photo: Jonathan Barbot

Château de Milandes

A beautiful 15th-century castle in the heart of the Dordogne valley, made most famous by former owner the American chanteuse Josephine Baker, who lived here with her 12 adopted children. Famed for its birds of prey displays during the summer.

Château de Monbazillac
courtesy of Château de Monbazillac

Château de Monbazillac

Here, just south of Bergerac on a proud hilltop, you can combine a pleasant dégustation of the famous dessert wines with a visit to the small yet impressive château with Renaissance interiors and views over the vineyards.

Chateau de Puyguilhem
Chateau de Puyguilhem. Photo: OT Périgord Dronne Belle – Frédéric Tessier

Château de Puyguilhem

A Renaissance jewel in the north of the region, Puyguilhem is an elegant building with classic proportions and Loire-esque turreted rooflines. Hard to believe it was once abandoned until the French state intervened in the 20th century.

Château de Sauveboeuf

Only opened to the public in 2013, this is a Louis XIII château overlooking the River Vézère not far from the Lascaux caves. The owner will often be on hand to share his special interest in prehistoric artefacts.

From France Today magazine

Château Da Sauveboeuf
courtesy of Château Da Sauveboeuf

Brand Spanking New: The Gare de Nice Gets a Makeover

The Gare de Nice
The Gare de Nice. Photo: Mary Kay Seales

If you’ve travelled to or from Nice on the train, you may remember the train station there as a rather dismal and somewhat confusing place. People crowding together to get through to the platforms, bumping elbows and closely guarding pockets and purses. Always a “traffic jam” by the entrance to the platform as a horde of travelers tried to navigate through the crowd to stamp their tickets, as required, in the little yellow machines.

The ticket office stood off to one side, awkwardly designed so as to require queuing up in a long line to wait for an agent.

Outside and below this office, a lone and uninviting restaurant with few other options nearby.

In fact, I think many would agree that the whole area in and surrounding the Gare de Nice was one to simply get away from as quickly as possible.

Now, dear past and future visitors to Nice, all that has wonderfully changed! This once disheveled building and its environs has had a major facelift.

Gare de Nice
The main hall with a beautifully restored ceiling. Photo: Mary Kay Seales

The building itself has been lovingly restored. The ornate grillwork over the main entrance has been polished up, and the lovely set of arched doors now enter into a spacious, open and light-filled room. The large square ceiling has been painted like a chapel and the platform doors to the trains are now opened up, giving travellers the freedom to come and go. No more crowds squeezing through a limited area.

The train schedules are projected onto the side of one wall giving it all a clean updated feel, and there are other bright new schedule signs throughout.

And those little yellow machines to stamp the tickets now sit rather sheepishly by the platform doors, still pretty but humbled.

To the left of the main waiting room is a new Relay store for your magazines newspapers and candy; to the right, a shiny new sandwich shop where you can stock up before boarding your train to Paris or Avignon.

Gare de Nice
The new deli inside the station. Photo: Mary Kay Seales

The far end of the station is now the ticket office, complete with a ‘take-a-number’ machine and bright décor – purple and yellow chairs for waiting and tables where you can plug in a laptop.

All these changes are refreshing and welcome! But there’s more. The exterior of the station has also had a makeover. The huge open plaza in front is now home to a modern tourist office and a Paul boulangerie/patisserie.

These changes to the station have had a larger impact on the entire area near the Gare, with people relaxing at restaurants across the street. From super sketchy to stylish, it is a remarkable transformation!

The overhaul of the Nice Gare is not complete; the work goes on. But already the new look and feel of this busy station on the Côte d’Azur will make landing in this charming city a treat.

Gare de Nice
The exterior of the Gare de Nice. Photo: Mary Kay Seales

CREDIT/SOURCE: By Mary Kay Seales – FRANCE TODAY

The Queen Mother’s Favourite Fruit Cake

For the cake:

  • 225g dried dates chopped
  • 1 teaspoon bicarbonate of soda
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 50g dried walnuts, roughly chopped
  • 275g plain flour
  • 225g caster sugar
  • 1 large egg, beaten
  • 75g butter

For the icing:

  • 5 tablespoons brown sugar
  • 2 tablespoons cream
  • 2 tablespoons butter

Grease and line a 23cm x 30cm tin.  Heat oven to 180ºF.

To make the cake:

Put the chopped dates in a bowl and pour over a breakfast cup of boiling water. Add the bicarbonate of soda and stir in. Set aside. Cream the butter with the sugar in another bowl. Beat in the egg and vanilla. Sieve together the flour, baking powder and salt. Add to the butter, sugar and egg mix, then the dates and incorporate well. Scrape the batter into the baking pan and spread it right to the edges. Bake the cake in the centre of the oven for 35 minutes or until a skewer comes out clean. To make the topping: In a small heavy saucepan, melt the butter, brown sugar and cream over a low heat. Bring the mixture to the boil and boil gently for 3 minutes, stirring all the time. Pour over warm cake. When cool, store in an airtight tin.

Credit/Source:  Julia Watson, The Bugle