Stop Shaming Victims

“France’s gender equality minister has announced the government’s new plans against domestic abuse”: it would allow the authorities to deal with “the most insidious situations, which don’t leave a mark to the naked eye but can mutilate the victim’s inner self.” Those found guilty face up to three years in jail and a fine of 75,000 euros, or about $90,000. (NY Times)

‘Friends often think he’s the nicest man in the world’ – Abusers can have a Jekyll-and-Hyde personality; Dr. Jekyll is often charming and hides behind a public persona. Usually, abuse takes place behind closed doors. Abusers deny their actions & blame the victim, are hypersensitive and may react with rage.

Let’s all (#metoo) campaign against worldwide domestic abuse & help stop the violence !

Image may contain: 2 people
Advertisements

Language Lundi

puzzles #05

 

Across: 1-finger (5)4-sweeping brush, broom (5)7-nerves (5)11-meat (6)13-translator (10)

15-forty (8)

16-received (fem.)(5)

18-corner (4)

20-north (4)

21-embarrassing, awkward, a

nuisance (plural) (7)

23-worry, trouble, problem (5)

25-turkey (5)27-concerning, regarding – ‘a l’…de’ (5)31-they want – ‘ils …’(7)32-pungent, acrid (4)33-nothing (4)36-heart (5)37-colors (8)

40-to welcome (10)

42-coral reef – ‘… de corail’ (6)

43-forest (5)

44-wearing away (5)

45-pond (5)

Down: 2-eye (4)3-knee (5)5-I will wait – ‘j’…’(9)6-to irritate (6)8-is (3)

9-crowd (5)

10-worker (7)

12-screens (6)

14-pocket (5)

15-who (3)

17-to fill (e.g. a glass)(7)

19-noodle, pasta (7)

22-shooting, firing (3)24-born (fem)(3)26-to discover (9)28-given (5)29-place (7)30-dreamer (6)34-they (3)

35-schools (6)

36-cocoa (5)

38-account, story, narrative (5)

39-so that (4)

41-one (fem.)(3)

 

ANSWERS:

Across: 1-doigt;4-balai;7-nerfs;11-viande;13-traducteur;15-quarante;16-recue;18-coin;20-nord;21-genants;23-ennui;25-dinde;27-egard;31-veulent;32-acre;33-rien;36-coeur;37-couldurs;40-accueillir;42-recifs;43-foret;44-usure;45-etang

Down: 2-oeil;3-genou;5-attendrai;6-agacer;8-est;9-foule;10-ouvrier;12-ecrans;14-poche;15-oui;17-charger;19-nouille;22-tir;24-nee;26-decouvrir;28-donne;29-endroit;30-reveur;34-ils;35-ecoles;36-cacao;38-recit;39-afin;41-une

 

Credit: French Language Games

 

 

MPs to debate pain au chocolat vs chocolatine

The MPs are demanding that the rural and fisherie code, le code rural et de la pêche, “value the working title and the reputation of products”. “For example, this would be the case for the chocolate pastry whose name has historically been rooted in the Gascon region, and which is the pride of all of southern France: the chocolatine,” argued Aurélien Pradié, an MP from the southwest Lot department, who is backing theamendment. “This is not just a chocolatine amendment. It’s an amendment that aims to protect popular expressions that give value to culinary expertise.”

A website created in 2017 surveyed the country in an attempt to settle the age-old debate once and for all: of the 110,000 people surveyed 59.8% say pain au chocolat and 40.2% say chocolatine, but theresults highlighted the regional disparity. Those in the south-west of France almost all use chocolatine, with the remainder of the country opting for pain au chocolat. With linguistic battle lines drawn up, Bugle readers find themselves on the front line. In the Creuse and Haute-Vienne, the vast majority favour the term pain au chocolat, but in Corrèze and Dordogne, well over 90% of those surveyed prefer a chocolatine.

Where the name itself comes from has also been the source of much debate. Oneenjoyable (but probably false) theory is that it originated fom the period of English rule over France’s Aquitaine region in the 15th century. The English wouldwalk into bakeries and ask for “chocolate in bread” which the French understood as,simply, “chocolate in”. This theory has been disputed, however, mostly due to the fact that chocolate did not arrive in Europe until 1528!

It is a debate that has raged across France for decades, if not centuries…what do you call the chocolate-filled pastries so common in the country’s bakeries? Most expats will probably answer pain au chocolat, the term we tend to hear when first learning the language. Much of the country would disagree, however, and vocally insist
that the pastry is in fact a chocolatine. The argument has now reached the country’s parliament as ten Les Républicains MPs have tabled a change in the law to favour the use of chocolatine. The proposed amendment to the Agriculture and Food laws would promote the use of the term which is widely employed across the southwest and west of the country.

 

Source/Credit: THE BUGLE, June 2018

9 Common Types Of Red Wine You Need In Your Wine Rack

1. Cabernet Sauvignon

Description: Cabernet Sauvignon hails from all over the world, but first started its heavy growth in the Bordeaux region of France.  As far as types of red wine go, Cab is generally a full bodied wine with bold tannins due to the higher concentration of alcohol.

Tasting Notes: Dark current, dark cherry, and other darker fruit flavors can be found in most young Cabernet Sauvignons as well as herbal hints or baking spices. If aged in cedar or oak barrels, this type of wine will hold the essence of that method as well.

Food Pairings: Cabernet Sauvignon is a great meat and cheese wine. Think lamb, steak (is your mouth watering yet?), and firm aged cheese.

Source: Flickr

2. Merlot

Description: Types of red wine don’t get easier to drink than a Merlot. It’s the perfect beginners red with a smooth taste, medium level tannins, and deep fruity flavors. Merlot is also a very blend-able grape making for some delicious mixed wines worth picking up!

Tasting Notes: Merlot can have different flavor profiles depending on the climate it’s grown in. Hotter more humid climates will produce sweeter tannins and a black cherry mocha flavor. Where cooler climates will provide a full bodied tobacco, licorice, mineral Merlot.

Food Pairings: Whether your taste buds are craving roasted chicken, pork, or beef, Merlot will have your back. Avoid overwhelming spicy flavors, seafood, and green leafy vegetables.

Source: Wiki Media

3. Barbera

Description: Not as common in the types of red wine is Barbera, similar in style to Merlot. Barbera is an Italian grape that is widely grown in California as well. It’s got a silky smooth consistency and high acidity.

Tasting Notes: Black cherry is the name of the game with this red, too. Hints of plum are also common in these types of red wine.

Food Pairings: Anything you would pair Merlot with, you can also pair Barbera wines with. Both are superb matches for tomato based dishes!

Source: Wiki Media

4. Pinot Noir

Description: Pinot Noir boasts softer tannins and higher acidity. First grown in France regions, this type of red wine is known for being lighter in body, and totally yummy.

Tasting Notes: Types of red wine like Pinot Noir have breathtaking floral aromas. Underneath, this wine brings red-fruit flavors like cranberry and cherry to life. Not to be left out are notes of rhubarb, beet, and even sometimes a hint of mushroom.

Food Pairings: Pair a glass of Pinot Noir with your favorite sushi and salmon dishes. Don’t forget about chicken and lamb for delicious alternative pairings as well!

Source: Pixabay

5. Malbec

Description: Malbec is a Bordeaux born wine, but Argentina took hold and really made it their own. It can also be found in Chili as well as cooler regions of California. Because of this, flavor profiles very, but it is still a favorite among types of red wine choices in many households (including my own).

Tasting Notes: Depending on where you source your Malbec, you can expect hints of sour cherry, plums, berries, and spice.

Food Pairings: Malbec wines are great to pair with any meat based meals —noticing a trend yet? If you purchase Argentine Malbec, pair with Mexican, or Indian dishes, this wine is perfect for a little heat!

Source: Pixabay

6. Shiraz (or Syrah)

Description: Most commonly grown in Australia and parts of France, Shiraz (also known as Syrah) is one of the more full-bodied types of red wine. It’s in the middle of the tannin spectrum, and usually has bold fruit flavors.

Tasting Notes: Sipping on Shiraz leaves you with tastes of blueberry, tobacco, plum, meat, and black pepper.

Food Pairings: Pair Shiraz with cheeses from the Mediterranean, smoked meats, or even some wild game. Moose, anyone?

Source: Pixabay

7. Petit Sirah

Description: A rare —yet popular— grape, Petit Sirah largely grows in California and has a full-bodied flavor. It’s a medium acidity wine with high tannins, and high alcohol content. Petit Sirah is a wine made to blossom in a decanter. Pour it early and let it sit for two to four long awaited hours.

Tasting Notes: Black pepper, dark chocolate, blueberry, black tea and sugar plum are some of the delicious tastes you will find in a Petit Sirah.

Food Pairings: Love cheese? This wine will support your aged cheese affection. Start with some camembert or aged Gouda. For meat lovers, serve up some burgers or roasted pork, and try some barbeque!  This wine doesn’t forget vegetarians either! It pairs with eggplant, mushrooms, black beans, and so much more. Yum!

Source: Pixabay

8. Sangiovese         

Description: Sangiovese is primarily a Tuscan wine. Its color is lighter, and the high acidity level is no joke. This grape is a proud Chianti ingredient, and medium bodied.

Tasting Notes: Berry and plum flavors, pie cherry, anise, and tobacco can all be found tickling your taste buds with this wine!

Food Pairings: Naturally, this wine pairs well with Italian fair. All hail pizza, pasta, and red wine! Mediterranean food also works well with Sangiovese. It’s just one of those types of red wine that has you dreaming of a Tuscan vacation.

Source: Pixabay

9. Zinfandel

Description: California is the main grower of these types of wine, but Zinfandel vines originated from Croatia. Zinfandel ranges in color from light blush wines to deep rich red wines making them a fit for many wine lovers. Zinfandel has a higher alcohol percentage, and flavors can range as much as the color!

Tasting Notes: Depending on the bottle, you can taste a variety of flavors in Zinfandel from overripe nectarine, to raspberries and blueberries. Asian spices are no stranger to some and tobacco flavors to others.

Food Pairings: Grab a bottle of Zin if you’re in the market for takeout! Chinese, Thai, and Indian cuisine all pair well with this wine. As does cheddar cheese, and many meat options. You really can’t go wrong!

Source: Wiki Media

Not only will you impress your guests having these types of red wine on hand, but you’ll always have the perfect bottle for pairing with your next delicious meal. Keep in mind that it is considered best practice to always use an aerator when pouring your glass of wine!

 

Sisters Go French

Inspired by the U.S. group Sister’s on the Fly’s video (below), I have started a group “a la francaise”!

Please visit our Sisters Go French Facebook page; join the group page in order to view event details:  our first event being a Sisters Wine-ing Weekend” in October.

In the same spirt as the U.S. ladies, the only rule for Sisters Go French is:

“no men, no kids, be kind, and open to having ‘me time’ fun!”

(After all, girls just wanna have fun, n’est-ce pas?)

 

France retains tourism crown

France looks on course to reach its ambitious target of 100 million visitors per year by 2020 after figures released by the UN show that a record 89 million tourists visited these shores in 2017 – an increase of six million on 2016.

Visitor numbers had suffered in recent years follow in a series of terror attacks in Paris and elsewhere across France in 2015 and 2016, but holidaymakers are now returning in their droves.  The report from the UN’s World Tourism Organisation shows that global tourism jumped 7% last year with France well ahead of second-placed Spain. With 82.3 million tourists in 2017, Spain overtook the USA as the world’s second most popular destination, despite terror attacks of its own and independence demonstrations in Catalonia. In 2016, America welcomed 75.6 million visitors – 300,000 more than Spain. Currently, tourism generates 7% of France’s GDP although the government hopes to increase that figure to 10%.

In further good news, British magazine The Economist has voted France as its “country of the year” for 2017. The centre-left leaning political magazine gave particular praise to France for the voting in of Macron and his party La République en marche. They judged that the president, despite coming from a “party full of political novices”, had “crushed the old guard”, “swept aside the ancien régime” and “transformed the national political debate”.

According to The Economist’s website:  “Rogue nations are not eligible, no matter how much they frighten people. (Sorry, North Korea). Nor do we plump for the places that exert the most influence through sheer size or economic muscle – otherwise China and America would be hard to beat. Rather, we look for a country, of any size, that has changed notably for the better in the past 12 months, or made the world brighter.” ■

Article source:  The Bugle, Feb. 2017