Christmas Markets in France

Traditionally, housewives would spend the weeks preparing the festive feast. Christmas markets in France developed to supply them with the ingredients.

Source/Click link: Christmas Markets in France

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St Nicholas… Santa Claus… Father Christmas

HO! HO! HO!

Even though some of the American/British folkloric characters don’t come to France, you’ll be happy to know that the jolly old man in the red suit does. Of course, he goes by a different name: in France he’s known as Père Noël, or Father Christmas.

Read more of this article by Margo Letz HERE

 

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- The Curious Rambler -

Santa Nast 1881

Even though some of the American/British folkloric characters don’t come to France, you’ll be happy to know that the jolly old man in the red suit does. Of course, he goes by a different name: in France he’s known as Père Noël, or Father Christmas.

History of St Nick
The history of Santa Claus, or Father Christmas, dates back to the 4th century, when a priest from the area that is now Turkey came on the scene. He was known for his generosity, said to have performed miracles and eventually became Saint Nicholas, the protector saint of children. The legend evolved over the centuries that on December 6th, St Nick would descend from the sky on his donkey (or sometimes on a white horse), go into houses by way of the chimney and leave gifts for well-behaved children. The children would leave their shoes by the fireplace with some carrots…

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Diner de Noël – Christmas Dinner

The evening after the “Réveillon,” which is Christmas Day, there was another French family dinner – less formal but equally delicious as the one the night before.  This festivity started with sipping champagne at 8 p.m., with hors d’ouvres of spiced olives and smoked salmon toasts.  Gifts were opened around 9:30, and then dinner was served:  entrée, plat, and dessert – less food than the previous evening’s six-course meal which was a good (literally & figuratively)!

I suppose my New Year’s resolution should be to eat less or drink less champagne – pas possible! 🙂

Poinsettia rouge

Poinsettia rouge

table

Boudin (sausage) with apple & fig

Boudin (sausage) with apple & fig

Magret de canard (duck) with orange sauce & chestnuts

Magret de canard (duck) with orange sauce & chestnuts

Vanilla ice cream with creme de marron (chestnut glaze)

Vanilla ice cream with creme de marron (chestnut glaze)

Pontsettia blanche

Pontsettia blanche

Cooking for the French vs. French Cooking

OK – it’s no secret that I didn’t inherit the ‘cooking gene’ — when I was growing up, it was mostly plain, broiled steak, spaghetti, pot roast, hamburger, or meatloaf for dinner. However, I did spend summers at my aunt’s house in the country, and boy, could she cook (mostly hearty, meat and potato-type meals); and bake like nobody’s business — I remember how she always had a pie or cake cooling on the kitchen window sill and the wonderful smells in the house! Unfortunately, I was too young to care and resented having to help shuck corn and snap green beans from the huge garden. I wish I had paid more attention!

“Le Réveillon de Noël” (Christmas eve dinner) in France is a really big deal. I had been lucky enough to not have to host it….until, last Christmas — it was MY turn, as the American cooking for the French! I started stressing out months before, trying to figure out what to serve, let alone attempt to cook, for the expected 10-12 French guests. I finally settled on:

    • an entrée (starter) of the classic, grilled foie gras, served on a toasted slice of pain d’épice (spice ginger-type bread)
    • leg of lamb, as the plat principale (which I had never cooked before nor eaten much of), served with potatoes au gratin
    • salade verte (green salad) with vinaigrette, served after the main course
    • cheese tray – not as easy as you might think, in choosing from the over 400 types of French cheeses
    • La Bûche de Noël for dessert (log cake, bought at the local bakery – whew!)
    • Apertifs, wines, water (sparkling and flat but which brands?), and after dinner liquors — more choices to be made with serious contemplation.

Not to mention, the setting and presentation of the table– cutlery arrangement with fork tines up vs. down, centerpiece, decorations, dishes & glass placements, and table etiquette. (amusing video link)

OK, I was ready – with printed recipes and the timing of the courses calculated to a tee! Just when I thought I had it all figured out, a guest threw a wrench in the works by bringing an entrée of sausages and cooked apples — a very nice gesture to help relieve my having-to-cook stress.  Yet, it had to be heated, and by the time my starter was to be also served, the toasted pain d’épice had cooled and turned into a cement foundation under the foie gras.  One of the guests was tapping it with their spoon to confirm that “oui,” it was hard as a brick and impenetrable!  And of course, by now, the entire meal had been cooking longer than planned, and my stress level was off the charts!

When it was all said and done, the rest of the meal went OK, although I was convinced it hadn’t.  No one wanted cheese nor after dinner drinks, though…..maybe they just wanted to get home to their own French food!!