Coaraze – A Sundial Village (les cadrons solaires)

entrance signCoaraze map“Coaraze, classé « un plus beau village de France », est situé à 44 kms de Cagnes, en amont de Contes, à 667 m d’altitude.  Le village est bâti, au XV° siècle, sur un piton gréseux qui domine la vallée du Paillon. et il est devenu célèbre pour ses cadrans solaires réalisés à partir de 1960 à la demande du Maire de l’époque. Jean Cocteau, entre autres, y a apporté sa contribution.”  (credit: AVF)

Classified as one of the most beautiful villages of France, Coaraze is a 15th century village, 25 km. north of North & perched at 650m alt. – called the sun village due to its sun-dials.  The winding cobble-stone streets take you through sunny squares bursting with flowers and lead on to show you the houses of stone, or painted in the Italian fashion of blue, pink, or yellow pastels. Interesting architectural details in the medieval village: lintels, doors and windows, semi-circular vaults, and entrances.

Churches:  St. Sebastien chapel 14thc. church and Chapelle Notre Dame du Gressier – the blue chapel decorated by Ponce de Leon.

Blue chapel

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Coaraze is the world champion in the game of pilou currently has the youngest mayor in France, and he is an artist and a poet.

The sundials of:  Cocteau, Valentin, Mona Christie, Doukine, Ponce de Leon, Henri Goetz.

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EVENT 06: Fête des Vendanges et des Châtaignes

REBLOGGED FROM The Riviera Grapevine

What have you got planned for Sunday?

If you happen to be in the area, and fancy a chance to sample some of the unique wines of the Alpes-Maritimes, why not pop into the annual Fête des Vendanges et des Châtaignes in Saint-Paul de Vence?

October 19th marks the 2014 edition of this annual harvest festival for theVins des Baous et des Collines. Translated into normal speak, this term refers to the three vineyards found high in the hills behind the Riviera coastline, near the imposing cliff face above Saint-Jeannet:

  • Domaine Saint Joseph in Tourettes-sur-Loup and Saint-Paul de Vence
  • Le Petit Vigneau/Domaine La Vasta in Saint-Paul de Vence
  • Domaine Les Hautes Collines de la Côtes d’Azur in Saint-Jeannet

The setting is quintessentially southern French, Place de Gaulle in Saint-Paul de Vence.

Fête des Vendanges et des Châtaignes

For one day only, this popular square for playing pétanque is given over to this autumnal celebration of wines, chestnuts and other delicious local specialties (my advice is to queue early for the socca).

Last year, along with my wine partners-in-crime Rod (from the Riviera Wine Academy) and Tom, I enjoyed a glorious October afternoon wandering the dozen or so stands. The three vineyards had a generous selection of their wines on tasting, which were also available to buy.

This year, I’m looking forward to tasting the 2013 vintage, although I’ll be even more excited next year as the grapes I helped harvest at both Domaine Saint Joseph and Le Petit Vigneau this September will have finally made it into the bottle!

If you do plan to go, why not combine the event with an exploration of the medieval alleyways of Saint-Paul de Vence, one of the Côte d’Azur’s most charming villages? You could further spoil yourself by lunch in the village (La Colombe d’Or, I wish!) or browsing original works by Matisse, Léger and Kandinsky (to name a few) at Saint-Paul’s renowned Foundation Maeght,  currently celebrating its 50th anniversary.

Credit:  Chrissie at The Riviera Grapevine

Bellet Wines in Nice

Just 30 minutes from the center of Nice is one of the oldest wine regions in France, dating back to the arrival of the Phocean Greek traders from Marseille.  Some vines are over 1000 years old and the wines of Bellet were awarded the coveted AOC (Appellation d’Origine Controllée) accreditation status in 1941.

Twice a year, the 10 AOC Bellet vineyards in the hills behind Nice open their doors and start popping corks – ‘Portes Ouvertes’ is a perfect opportunity to get tasting the local wines – free of charge!

Interactive domain map HERE (Organic wines are made at the Domaine de la Source.)

Portes ouvertes :
Samedi 24 et dimanche 25 mai 2014
Samedi 29 et dimanche 30 novembre 2014

Visitors welcome between 10am and 6pm on both days.

Enjoy a wine lover’s escape from the hustle and bustle of the city!

(Public bus transportation access or by car – Don’t forget to have a designated driver)

 See my previous post for the Chateau de Cremat in Bellet HERE

Source/Credit: The Riviera Reporter

 

 

 

 

 

 

JOURNÉES EUROPÉENNES DU PATRIMOINE

Affiche JEP-2014logo-ministere-de-la-culture-et-de-la-communication

 

 

 

 

 

 SEPTEMBER 20-21, 2014

Le week-end du 20 et 21 septembre 2014, les Journées du Patrimoine reviennent avec pour thème “Patrimoine culturel, patrimoine naturel”. Comme chaque année environ 16 000 sites publics ou privés seront ouverts au public.

This annual event is a unique opportunity to discover local heritage in all its splendour and variety by visiting sites and architectural features. A wide range of activities is organised throughout the department.

2014 Schedule:

Program in NICE 

Search in other Regions

France 3 Video HERE

 

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September Events in France

In Nice:france cartoon

Jeux de la Francophonie (Nice): 7-15 September, the 7th edition of this cultural and athletic youth event will take place with sporting, traditional and creative competitions between participants representing French-speaking nations from around the globe. www.nicetourisme.com

Nationwide events in France September 2014:

France Gourmet Week known as “Tous Au Restaurant”22-28 September 2014. All over France for a whole week restaurants will put offer a buy one meal, get one free menu. Search on the website for participating restaurants:www.tousaurestaurant.com

Fete de la Gastronomie 26-28 September, every corner of France will come alive with events to celebrate its UNESCO-listed ‘world intangible heritage’ status. From grand-scale concerts to local sing-a-longs, Michelin-star set menus to small village banquets, the country will be in lively spirits to celebrate one of its most popular claims to fame. www.economie.gouv.fr/fete-gastronomie

Journées Européennes du Patrimoine – European Heritage Days: 20 and 21 September across the whole country, hundreds of historical buildings, famous monuments, Government sites and places of interest – some of which are normally closed to the public, open their doors and welcome in visitors. It is an amazing opportunity to explore and find out more about some truly fantastic buildings in France. Discover the heritage of France, more about Journées Européennes du Patrimoine. www.journeesdupatrimoine.culture.fr/

 

AMUSEZ-VOUS BIEN!

Information Source: TheGoodLifeFrance

The Art of Baroque Dancing

What is baroque dance?

The term is used to refer to ballroom and theatrical dance of France, other Western European countries, and their colonies during the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries.

Is baroque dance baroque (that is, highly decorated, ornamented, and so on)?

Well, sometimes. The steps can be highly decorated, curved shapes and paths are often used, and the choreographic thread is sometimes elaborately nonlinear.  But it can also have elements of classical order and symmetry, and even simplicity.

So why is it called baroque dance?

Presumably, partly by analogy with music and other arts of roughly the same period, and partly because it does have baroque elements.

History

The origins of the baroque dance are found in the court at Versailles during the reign of Louis XIV of France in the 1600s. The art of ballet was born under his rule, thanks to his passion for dance. Because of Louis XIV, balls, operas and the baroque dance played a pivotal role in the lifestyle at Versailles.

Baroque dancers at Vaux-le-Vicomte

Baroque dancers

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Louis XIV

Louis’ connection with the dance was personal. When he took the throne at a young age, according to Labelldanse.com, “his authority was opposed by a faction of nobles in a series of uprisings known as the ‘Frondes'”. After the Second Fronde was conquered, “Cardinal Mazarin (who ruled through the regent, Louis’ mother, Anne of Austria)” directed a ballet called “Le Ballet de la Nuit.” In the la Nuit, Louis danced the main role of the Rising Sun. While Louis acted In character as the sun, he warned that anyone who chose to oppose his power “would soon feel his heat.” This threat was directed towards the nobles, reminding them that their opposition to the royal authority would not be tolerated

Dance as a Weapon

After Louis had felt his power as the Rising Sun character, he employed dance with the mindset of it being used as a weapon of State. Due to his enthusiasm for dance, the establishment of the Academie Royale de la Danse emerged in 1661. From then on, other ballets and operas that were composed by other directors such as J.B. Lully, praised Louis as “the wisest, most powerful and benevolent ruler in Christendom.”

The Baroque Dance Spreads

The form of dancing gathered popularity through parts of Europe, England and Spain. Other ballrooms and operas embraced the court dance forms and began teaching what Louis had created. In 1738, French dancing masters traveled as far as Russia, where Jean-Baptiste Lande established a school that gradually became the school of the Kirov Ballet at the Maryinsky Threater. According to Labelledanse.com, other French dance instructors traveled to the New World where French ballroom dances became popular “in the salons of the governors of New France (Quebec) and later at Colonial assemblies in which George Washington danced the minuet.”

Baroque Dance Evolves

The baroque dance form that was made famous under the Sun King continued to thrive during reigns of Louis XV and Louis XVI. As the French Revolution began in the late 19th century, the dance grew closer to the modern form of dance known as classical ballet.

 

Source: ehow.com

Les Nuits du Sud in Vence

Les Nuits du Sud is an annual outdoor series of concerts held in Vence.  The town blocks the entrances to the town a couple of hours before the start, in order to verify tickets of attendees and for those who are already inside the area, tickets are asked for and confirmed.

Since it had been rainy and the central area chairs were wet, we decided to sit on the terrace of a restaurant located just across from the stage area.  It was perfect as a dry, front row table for two with views of the large stage screens.  I found it amusing that my name was written as a name of nobility with ‘de’ and yes, it was a royal evening full of good food and music.

We listened to and enjoyed the singing of Maya Kamaty, followed by tango music by Plaza Francia. (videos below)

See remaining program HERE

 

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