12 of the Finest Dordogne Châteaux

This is a land of castles with any number of grand houses to visit. Here is our selection of the best.

Chateau de Beynac
Chateau de Beynac. Photo: OT intercommunal du Périgord noir

The fascinating history of the Dordogne from medieval to modern times is brought to life by the grandeur and mystique of some of its splendid châteaux. When you visit these medieval fortresses, Renaissance palaces and grand family estates you will encounter a rich tapestry, revealing accounts of love and war, ambition and tragedy, fairy-tale romance and escapism. Here is our selection – but many more fine examples await travellers looking for inspiring architecture and remarkable stories from days of yore.

 

Château de Beynac

This imposing fortified castle sitting on a dramatic cliff top location overlooking the River Dordogne has seen almost a thousand years of history played out against its stone walls and courtyards. It is one of the best-preserved in the region.

Château de Bridoire
courtesy of Château de Bridoire

Château de Bridoire

A beautiful 15th-century château near Bergerac, once neglected but now happily in private hands and undergoing a small renaissance. Many restored and furnished rooms to view as well as medieval-style games. Popular with families.

Chateau de Biron
Chateau de Biron. Photo: Pays des bastides

Château de Biron

Near Monpazier, in the south of the Dordogne, this dramatic château from the 12th century is perched on a hillside overlooking the Périgord and Agenais countryside. Visitors will appreciate its many beautiful architectural features.

Chateau de Bourdeilles
Chateau de Bourdeilles. Photo: Semitour Perigord

Château de Bourdeilles

The site of one of the four baronnies of the Périgord, this is an impressive château with a spectacular tower overlooking the River Dronne in the north of the Dordogne near Brantôme. The château and surrounding village are worth a visit.

Chateau de Castelnaud
Chateau de Castelnaud. Photo: M. Boutry

Château de Castelnaud

In the heart of the Périgord Noir this is a medieval fortress with a military history. In keeping with its past life, today it houses a museum of medieval warfare. Enactments of Cathar history take place on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday evenings in summer.

Chateau d'Hautefort
Chateau d’Hautefort. Photo: OT Château d’Hautefort

Château de Hautefort

Closer in appearance to a Loire château, the golden age of this majestic building in the north of the Dordogne was during the time of the Marquis de Hautefort in the 16th and 17th centuries. The beautiful formal gardens are a must-see.

Château de Jumilhac
courtesy of Château de Jumilhac

Château de Jumilhac

The Château de Jumilhac is to be found in the north of the Dordogne, on the route of Richard the Lionheart. With its picturesque turreted Renaissance roofline this imposing château strikes visitors as the quintessential romantic castle.

Château de Lanquais
courtesy of Château de Lanquais

Château de Lanquais

In the Périgord Pourpre, this château dates from the Middle Ages but also boasts some fine work by Italian craftsmen who later helped transform some parts of it into a Renaissance palace. It has been owned by the same family since 1732.

Chateau de Milandes
Chateau de Milandes. Photo: Jonathan Barbot

Château de Milandes

A beautiful 15th-century castle in the heart of the Dordogne valley, made most famous by former owner the American chanteuse Josephine Baker, who lived here with her 12 adopted children. Famed for its birds of prey displays during the summer.

Château de Monbazillac
courtesy of Château de Monbazillac

Château de Monbazillac

Here, just south of Bergerac on a proud hilltop, you can combine a pleasant dégustation of the famous dessert wines with a visit to the small yet impressive château with Renaissance interiors and views over the vineyards.

Chateau de Puyguilhem
Chateau de Puyguilhem. Photo: OT Périgord Dronne Belle – Frédéric Tessier

Château de Puyguilhem

A Renaissance jewel in the north of the region, Puyguilhem is an elegant building with classic proportions and Loire-esque turreted rooflines. Hard to believe it was once abandoned until the French state intervened in the 20th century.

Château de Sauveboeuf

Only opened to the public in 2013, this is a Louis XIII château overlooking the River Vézère not far from the Lascaux caves. The owner will often be on hand to share his special interest in prehistoric artefacts.

From France Today magazine

Château Da Sauveboeuf
courtesy of Château Da Sauveboeuf
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8 thoughts on “12 of the Finest Dordogne Châteaux

  1. diane frisch says:

    When we have visited France, we have only gone to Paris or the Cote D’Azur. You have shown me that we need to get out and see more of your beautiful country! I am fascinated with the beautiful and romantic castles!

    • Merci, Diane! The Loire Valley is well-known for its magnificent castles too & a good place to start for chateaux-hopping 🙂 France is very diverse and has many lovely areas to visit. If you ever get to this area (Dordogne), let’s try to meet up. Bonne journee!

      • diane frisch says:

        Merci! Our travels are pretty well planned out already for 2017, but maybe in 2018… I am not a big fan of cold weather. When do you think is the best time to tour the Loire valley?

  2. I used to travel to France late May/early June or September to avoid the summer crowds and still have decent weather. Bon voyage whereever your travels take you!

  3. junedesilva says:

    I spent a year in Tours, as a student, and visited many of the Loire chateaux. It’s really interesting to discover châteaux in other regions of France; thanks!

  4. Tours is a great city – I was there last summer – merci for your comment & bonne journee!

  5. Jill Barth says:

    Ahh, how lovely! These photos get the imagination going! Thank you.

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