An Anecdote About Table Linens

Photo from Pinterest

Photo from Pinterest

“Up until the sixteenth century, eating was a rather rough-and-ready affair that we would certainly not describe as dining. As people and their habits became more refined, table settings and linens also became more refined. As the 16th century progressed, it became a sign of wealth for each diner to have his own napkin (rather than wiping one’s hands and mouth on clothes). It was a sign of even greater wealth if the napkins were changed for fresh ones several times as the meal progressed through its courses. These napkins were larger than the ones used today and were tied around the neck to protect all those expensive silks and brocades from dripping sauces, soups, and gravies. Because it was difficult to tie a napkin behind one’s head, polite diners helped each other with this little task and thus arose the saying “making both ends meet.”

Although there are many beautiful linen tables at flea markets, locally made cotton mats and napkins are mostly used. These can be purchased in wonderful colors and patterns and only become more beautiful with age. The best way to handle these table linens is to wash them with your favorite detergent and dry them on the line. Using scented linen water or scented sachets with table linens may interfere with food aromas much as scented candles on the table would.”

 

Source: Joie de Vivre, 2002

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s