Smoke Alarm Law

Just 2% of French homes were fitted with smoke alarms in 2013, compared to 89% in England and 98% in Norway. Yet between 600 and 800 deaths are caused by domestic fires every year in France.
It is now compulsory for all homes in France to have at least one fitted smoke alarm.1501 Smoke detector-4106bbe5

The new law comes into effect on March 8, 2015 and requires the owners and occupants of a property to ensure a properly functioning detector is fitted.

The French Ministry of Housing estimates that only 2% of houses in France are currently fitted with smoke alarms, compared to 98% in Norway and 89% in England.

Between 600 and 800 people die in house fires in France every year. Seven in 10 blazes start at night, after people have gone to bed. The ministry believes the number of fatalities would be halved if smoke detectors, which cost between €10 and €20 were fitted.

The ministry, in conjunction with the Ministry of the Interior and the Ministry of Ecology, Sustainable Development and Energy, has published the following information to help people select and fit an appropriate detector.

The device should be installed in a corridor or hallway leading to rooms that are used regularly. The sensor should be fitted to the ceiling or at the top of a wall, away from a source of smoke.

The occupant, the owner or agency managing a property is obliged to check the sensor is working properly on a regular basis. CE-accredited detectors are fitted with a ‘test’ button for this purpose.

To avoid smoke detectors that do not meet EU standards the following requirements must be observed:

The unit should be marked with the CE notation

A power indicator must be included

The unit should be powered by batteries that will work for at least a year, or include an AC-power cable

The unit must emit a visual or audible signal, independent of a power source, indicating the absence of batteries or low batteries. The fault signal must be different to the alarm signal.

When it detects smoke, the unit must emit an alarm of at least 85 dB (A) audible at three metres.

The following information must be indelibly marked on the unit: the brand name, address of the manufacturer or supplier number, date of the standard that the detector complies with, manufacturing date or batch number and type of battery to use

The unit should be supplied with instructions for installation and maintenance. It must also have a model certificate that the occupant must provide to an insurer in case of a claim for damage caused by fire.

Source: The Connexion & The Riviera Times

 

Advertisements

Myths debunked: 11 things you (wrongly) presumed about France

Stereotype: to believe unfairly that all people or things with a particular characteristic are the same. (wikipedia) The French are some of the most stereotyped people on the planet……french dog

Read more of this article HERE

  Credit: The Local

Photo source: Unknown

Life Quotes & A Medal

“You are never too old to set another goal or to dream a new dream.”

CS Lewis (Clive Staples Lewis, 1898-1963), was a novelist, poet and medievalist, who wrote The Chronicles of Narnia.

Ralph Waldo Emerson – On achieving your dreams:

“What lies behind us and what lies before us are tiny matters compared to what lies within us.” — Ralph Waldo Emerson

“Once you make a decision, the universe conspires to make it happen.” — Ralph Waldo Emerson

“Dare to live the life you have dreamed for yourself. Go forward and make your dreams come true.” — Ralph Waldo Emerson

BOOK COVER CONTEST SILVER MEDAL FINALIST 2014 (authorsdb)silver14:
solitary-desire-64-1418035093

Read the road I ‘traveled’ in search of a dream!

Trailer Video HERE

Available on Amazon as ebook & paperback

New Facebook page HERE

Hotel Spendide – Art & Food

While waiting to have lunch at the rooftop restaurant at the Hotel Spendide, I noticed the mosaic artwork in the lobby and was surprised to see they offer an art deco mosaic “guided tour.”

IMG_0003 IMG_0004

As we ascended to the 8th floor restaurant, L’essenciel, I was anticipating rooftop views, but still, it took my breath away.  As we drank “une coupe de champagne” and snacked on crackers, a huge “goeland” (sea gull) swooped down to have a snack, as well, then posted him/herself on a nearby post to watch us.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

As for lunch, we had a lovely view while dining among a large group of friends and new acquaintances. The three course meal, with aperos, wine, and sparkling water, was 56 Euros per person.

Six reasons why France is top tourist destination

 The Local looks at just how did France manage to attract over 84 million tourists last year – far more than any other country – and hear’s from one tourism industry chief in the country who believes the figures do not tell the full story.

Some 84.7 million visitors from across the world flocked to France in 2013, far more than any other country in the world, and plans are underway to up the number to above 100 million mark.

But what makes France such an attractive destination for holiday makers year after year? The Local looks at six reasons to explain the country’s tourism appeal.

But do the figures tell the real story of France’s table topping tourism industry? One professional says the ynumbers are misleading and France needs to do to match the success of the United States and Spain.

Six reasons:

1. The City of Light (incorrect with “s”)

It almost goes without saying, but the French capital is a huge draw for foreign visitors – over 30 million of them a year in fact, more than any other city in the world. What makes it so popular? Where to start. There’s the city’s romantic image, the stunning architecture, the Louvre museum, the iconic Eiffel Tower as well as the simple pleasure of sitting at a café terrace and watching the world go by. European and US visitors have flocked here from all the world for many years, and they keep coming back and in recent years the appeal of Paris has gripped the far east, with mor and more Chinese nationals coming to get a glimpse of the Champs Elysées and its array of boutiques.

And don’t forget Disneyland, which is a destination in itself for foreign visitors. With around 15 million visitors each year, the theme park, just to the east of the French capital is Europe’s top tourist destinaton.

2. A variety of sun, sea and mountains

Many French people shun international destinations for their summer holidays and instead choose to travel within their own country. Why? Well, as they’ll be keen to tell you, it’s because France has everything, from sandy beaches, to snow covered mountains and vast expanses of countryside.

Simon Dawson, from UK tour operator French Cycling Holidays, agrees. “Different regions have completely different appearances,” he says. “There’s the rolling countryside, great cities like Paris, Lyon, Marseille.”

Basically France offers something for everyone. While the Germans may come for the beaches, the Brits for the countryside the Americans come for the chateaux and the culture.

“The weather is a big factor too. “France tends to have really good weather in the summer, it’s hot, but not baking hot like in Spain or Italy for example,” says Dawson.

3. Strategic location

Part of France’s appeal, however, could just be a sheer coincidence of geography. For example, for UK holidaymakers looking to escape their homelands unreliable summers, France is just a short hop across the Channel, a journey some 12.6 million made in 2013. Travellers from another of France’s neighbours, Germany, made up 13 million visitors to France last year, more than any other country. However, not all these visitors are coming to see France itself.

“Because of France’s position many tourists are forced to pass through the country on their way to other destinations,” explains Didier Arino, president of tourism industry specialists Protourisme. “Between 15 and 20 million of the visitors who come to France are just passing through on their way to Italy or Spain.”

4. Escape to the countryside

Around 80 percent of France is countryside – and most of it stunning and tranquil. Besides Paris, this is the part of France most tourists want to see, says Dawson. “The most popular areas for our customers are the Loire Valley, Provence, the famous beautiful regions of France,” he says.

The countryside is particularly popular with those from the UK, who have a romantacised vision of rural life in France, according to Protourisme’s Arino.

“The British are in love with rural France. They idealise the countryside,” he says. The Brits enjoythe contrast of the peaceful “France profonde” compared to the hussle and bussle of the towns and cities many of them live in.

5. Food and wine

France is, of course, inseparable from its famed gastronomical traditions and the chance to dine on French specialities, even the clichéd snails or steak tartare is no doubt a major part of what attracts visitors to the country. France knows this and is keen to protect its status as the world’s food capital, as evidenced by its recent “homemade” food label scheme designed to discourage chefs from using frozen or ready-prepared ingredients.

No proper French meal is complete without a few glasses of ‘vin’ and the country’s vast array of home-produced wines is another draw for tourists. Each year, around 24 million foreign tourists visit Bordeaux, Burgundy and France’s other wine regions.

6. Art , history and culture

France is extremely proud of its long and often tumultuous history, from the French revolution to Napoleon and the two world wars, and historical sites are often on the itinerary for visitors. There’s the famous battle sites of the Somme and the D-Day landings, as well as the stunning chateaux, churches and cathedrals that decorate the landscape.

In fact, France has some 39 sites on Unesco’s World Heritage list, putting it fourth in the global rankings. Museums and art galleries are also a major pull for tourists. The Louvre alone, home to the Mona Lisa among around 35,000 other artifacts and artworks, attracts 9.7 million visitors a year, more than any other museum in the world.

The Lonely Planet’s destination editor Kate Morgan sums it all up like this: “As a destination for travellers, France virtually has it all. France entices people of all ages with some of the world’s most iconic landmarks, world-class art and architecture, sensational food, stunning beaches, glitzy ski resorts, beautiful countryside and a staggering amount of history.”

But do the stats tell the real picture?

Despite being the world’s most visited country, France is hoping to boost its tourism numbers still further. Earlier this year, Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius unveiled a plan to increase foreign visitor numbers to more than 100 million a year.

Protourisme’s Arino, however is not getting carried away with the figures. For him France needs to focus on persuading the tourists to spend more. While France has the highest number of visitors a year, it is only third in the world when it comes to revenue generated from tourism, he says

“These figures don’t give the whole picture,” he says. “For me France is the third tourist destination in the world, behind the United States and Spain, where the tourism industry in both countries generates more money than in France.

“The only figure that matters is the commercial revenue, not the amount of visitors.

Arino points to the situation of tourists sleeping in their cars as they pass through France on the way to Spain, who are no use to the country economically.

For France to squeeze more money out of visitors Arino says it needs to improve the variety and prices of the accommodation it offers, encourage people to stay longer by giving them a warmer welcome, and make France more competitive in terms of value for money.

Foreign Minister Fabius would agree and has come up with a list of tasks to help improve the welcome for visitors to France.

Source/credit/photos: Written by Sam Ball published in The Local